Skip to main content

About your Search

20121205
20121213
STATION
CNBC 26
CSPAN 20
CSPAN2 16
FBC 13
CNNW 6
MSNBCW 4
MSNBC 3
KCSM (PBS) 2
KQED (PBS) 2
WBAL (NBC) 2
CNN 1
KGO (ABC) 1
LINKTV 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 102
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 106 (some duplicates have been removed)
are not in a position to do things that we otherwise would be in a position to in terms of shaping the environment to prevent war. so in my view, americas 60 veto fiscal picture increases the risk of conflict around the globe media not always involving the u.s., though certainly the risk of increasing globally. based on our fiscal picture. the point that i would want to make is the budget deal requires us to deal with a full deck of cards and those people who keep wanting to take things off the table. when i say a full deck of cards, that includes defense participating in deficit reduction. this cannot be in the case of defense a sledgehammer approach. it's going to take a long line of dealing with these issues overtime to give the defense department time and they can make in my view very significant changes in the budget, but doing it in a way that does not damage our security. doing it abruptly as the fiscal cliff does or in a very compressed time frame is not only inefficient and dangerous to security in our s. my final point is that they are missing an element in this town is primarily politic
than expected. >> every month we waste makes protecting the environment more expensive and increases the problems for the people whose lives have already been adversely affected. we have no time to lose. >> even germany, considered a leader on environmental protection, has come under criticism. the mayan minister could not live up to his promise. environmental groups say it is largely down to chancellor angela merkel. >> merkel has not use her voice strongly enough, and that is why the situation in the eu is so critical. it is lacking a leader, and effects are being felt everywhere. >> climate experts warn that if emissions do not sink in the coming years, the consequences will be dire. a new climate treaty is due before 2020, but after events in doha, that is looking more unlikely than ever. >> as we saw in that report, the german environment minister is playing a key role in the climate talks. we asked if he thought there would be a breakthrough. >> first of all, we are in the middle of a very, very important and difficult negotiation process. i expect negotiations going on all day
a pollution, dangerous to the environment in co2 is of course that these plans. they attempt to surprise or two epitomize the anti-nature, enterprise spirit of this administration. the reason we need another supply-side revival of the same kind we had under ronald reagan. >> would you change anything you wrote in the original "wealth and poverty"? >> i would've changed quite a lot. there's all kinds of details that a changed. but i found that to try to change one thing would be to change everything. so you know, you get into the morass of editorial work. so instead of changing an essentially retained the old look and added 40,000 new words at the beginning and kind and revision of my monetary policy in the middle. it's a new book, but it contains the old book veered >> pennysaver bishop monetary policy, what do you mean by that? >> i failed to make clear in the original version of "wealth and poverty" that i believe can stable currencies. i don't believe including current these. i agree with steve forbes that flow currencies, which is the standard value by which every entrepreneur has to
on the overall security environment on the peninsula as well as in asia. >> did you follow up anything new? we been hearing rumblings for a time. anything new you can provide in terms of insight into lunches are things like that? >> i think you're tracking it pretty well for the media today there are indications of what they will call a satellite launch. we believe it is still the u.n. security resolutions because of the missile they'll be fired and the implications it has for ballistic missiles activity somewhere down the road and the destabilizing impact it will have on the security environment throughout the region, not just dependent. >> can you follow up on some of that? what is your assessment? they say they saw birth of her problems at their failed launch. what is your assessment? how could they have felt the problems? juicier ran possibly helping them? and do you think he's doing this in response to hard-liners in his own government? why would he be doing this? >> well, the professed reason is to probably do it in conjunction with the anniversary on the 17th, which is widely reported i
patronage. that environment created an atmosphere as well in which the islamic opposition could take greater root, and it was essentially, you know, became more and more -- there were a number of events which, because of our lack of understanding of what was going on in libya, would, in retrospect, signal, you know, to people who are watching this, that things were not going well in libya, that essentially, the people were getting increasingly frustrated with gadhafi and had the potential to be -- to explode. you have the -- another seminal event was a massacre in 1996 in which 1250 people were killed. this was by gadhafi's head under the supervision allegedly of gadhafi's head of internal intelligence. this was very important because the victims of that massacre were primarily political prisoners and from the eastern part of the country, and the east, you know, in a very tightly knit tribal society, an act of that mag magnitude basicy created cascading resentment which came to haunt gadhafi basically. this was -- that was a major event in creating reresentment in the regime. there was large
commitment, where we are today, in protecting the environment? >> well, it says that the protection of environment goes up and down in america. basically because of the attitude of the president. and when president reagan came in, he removed the solar panels and sent them to a college up in, i think, connecticut. now we have one of the solar panels at the carter center, the museum, and number one producer of solar panels in the world in china, also bought one of the solar panels. so they have brought a lot of money in for that small college. we need to have consistency in america and committing ourselves to preserving the environment, protecting us from global warming which is real and we need leadership coming from the white house every day saying we need to do something about global warming. that hasn't happened yet. my hope is in president obama's second term he'll be the leader of the world and not lagging behind the other nations in doing something about global warming. >> you're a nuclear engineer at one point, promoted nuclear energy. how do you make the distinction between n
what they are doing here and implications in the overall security environment on the korean peninsula, as well as destination. >> anything new? we been hearing some rumblings for some time that there might be some activity on that front. anything new that you can provide in terms of insights into launches or things like that? >> well, i think you're tracking a pretty well. i think from the media today there are indications declared indications of their intention to do what they would call a peaceful satellite launch. and we believe it is in contradictory to the u.n. security council resolutions, that because of the nature of the type of missile they will be firing and the implications it has for ballistic missile type of activity somewhere down the road, and the destabilizing impact that will have on security incitement throughout the throughout the region, not just on the peninsula. >> can you follow up on some of -- was short assessment? they say they have solve whatever problems they had with her april failed launch. what's your assessment? how could they have solve the problem? wh
's volatile from a geopolitical standpoint. it's volatile from an environment, nature standpoint. >> rose: jeff immelt for the hour. next. >> rose: general electric is the nation's largest industrial company. it employs over 300,000 people around the world. it makes everything from aircraft engines to power plant turbines to medical imaging equipment. the company has evolved over the last decade over jeff immeant's watch. he has led a global expansion and shed once treasured businesses such as plastics and insurance. in 2011, president obama named him to lead the council on jobs and competitiveness. last month, the country created 146,000 jobs, exceeding expectations in the wake of hurricane sandy. further progress will be tested as the fiscal cliff deadline approaches without a deal inside yet. i'm very pleased to have jeff immelt back on this program. welcome >> charlie, thanks, good to be back with you. >> rose: we've talked many times about g.e. since you took over, i think once since -- just after 2001. where is the company today in terms of where do you want it to be and where do yo
environment, a huge life skill competitive sports in particular, extraordinary gain of american football. >> would you want for christmas? >> record by the dolphins but maybe we are off. we will see. i know i should aim higher. >> happy birthday. we are honored, we appreciate you being here. thank you for watching us. we are thankful for the partnership, thank you for coming out so early. thank you for a fantastic conversation. [applause] >> thank you for having me. >> the supreme court will look at what happened in 2008 by a majority of 6-3 and they are going to say that is a precedent and indiana had -- >> talking about facts, they decided on the indiana case it was constitutional for them to establish i d. they did not say that all of those states would subsequently -- [talking over each other] >> let me finish because you misrepresented what i said. [talking over each other] >> the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people, voter i.d. laws disproportionately affect minorities because it -- somehow we have something missing in our brain.
and let me go into an environment and suddenly find i like honey boo boo and i'm watching its. i think that is a huge part of the experience and i think it is sold short. i still think a lot of americans love the enjoyment of escapism and being able to roam around the tv jungle finding things they did not know were there. >> ice -- i think people still love discovery. every month or every year, i hear some show people are suddenly talking about that i do not think you could have ever imagines choosing. if you said, i want you to choose "honey boo boo," or a certain food channel network, i do not think i have to predetermined that was my preference. the ability to stumble on them or to hear people talking about them and let me go into an environment and babble around in that and decide, i sort of like "honey boo boo," i think that is a huge part of the american television experience. i think it gets sold short. i think a lot of americans love the enjoyment of escaping and being able to roam around finding things they did not know was there. >> michael powell on the future of television.
cash. here in the low-interest rate environment, debt financing is going to be big. >> and the large cap plays. go through those. >> verifone, a leader in electronic payment devices. this has been disrupted by new players like square and paypal and google. the stock has been hit, but our fund manager we talked to think it's been unfairly hit. any time an industry is being disrupted, that's a good opportunity. >> u.s. bancorp? >> this is an old fashioned bank. focuses on deposits and loans and wealth management. none of the other stuff that can get you into trouble. this is one our clients really liked. >> this year dividend plays have been huge. everyone is looking for income. they look to these companies that have a good yield. the two that came through here were ford and, as it happens, our majority owner comcast. >> yes. so ford, you know, the auto recovery story is pretty significant. it's still happening. cars on the road are older. the replacement rate is going to go up. with ford, it has a rock-solid balance sheet. its dividend yield, we think, could go up. comcast is interest
they are and will they be able to perform regardless of the macro environment? >> all right. we are focused on. companies that can grow regardless of what happens in the economy. three stocks we like, one is denbury resources. what's interesting about them is they have hedged their forward sales of oil so the lowest they're going to receive is $80 next year. at those rates, they're going to be a very profitable company. it's a very inexpensive stock. we like that. it's a u.s. oil producer as well. we like that. link linkedin, we think attracted as much attention as it should. they're executing very well in the professional business social networking sense. in particular, head hunters across the globe. this is now the method of head hunting. finally, an enterprise software design company used in making semiconductor chips. we see them as providing a very stable and growing play on technology without necessarily having to pick, you know, end winners. >> got it. >> thank you. >> very good, guys. thank you all for joining us today. rick, good luck with the reappraisal on your property there, whatever you're
to the golf game. that is the theory. that is no longer the case but in today's environment, now a consumer can access the bank on their terms. we have a credit union up in kingston, new york, open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. talk about customer convenience. >> he is eggsly -- especially recurring transfer and can't figure it out on the website. so nice to look at that person. does it work, say, for example, a tablet with a camera on it? can i use it from any device? >> that is our next phase in fact, liz. we'll take it to the tablet environment. we'll take it to the online environment. we have another product called the smart office. they have the ability to talk to an investment rep, mortgage rep. liz: can i deposit check by showing it to the teller? >> you can do that online anyway. you can do that through a mobile application out today. in our machine you actually scan it in and verifies the check as authentic. liz: disruptive technology it is known as. ugenius is the product. the founder and ceo, gene pranger. >> thank you. liz: david, he wasn't even a banker. david: you have to
, signs that drove him to do more to help the environment. >> giving the blessings to the people and healing that is not enough. i have to do more. the whole world is suffering from this climate crisis. >> he always carries holy water with him. he says it has stress-relieving properties, and that could be needed here. negotiators have come from all over the world. u.n. secretary general ban ki- moon is also here to push the talks forward. delegates were shown a bleak video portraying the terrible effects of climate change. few expect any breakthroughs here. instead, environmental groups put on a sarcastic performance, handing an award to the biggest contributors per-capita to climate change, new zealand, canada, and the u.s. 1 lebanese activist is one of the demonstrators. in his home country, climate protection is a side issue. conflict in the middle east and the civil war in syria take up the headlines. he wants to change that. >> if we take down a dictatorship to establish a democracy and i do not have a plan to live on, what shall i do with democracy? -- have a planet to live
legalized by a number of regions. even the spanish environment ministry is backing the move, hoping to see a rise in takings in national parks as a result of people buying hunting permits, but animal rights activists are far from happy, calling the horseback hunting savage. >> this is a story from spain about wild boars and a controversial method of hunting them. but it is also a story about a country in crisis and how one is sacrificed for the good of the other. this is a member of the old gentry. hunting has been in his family's blood for generations. he is helping revive the tradition of hunting wild boar on horseback with spears. the sport, known as pigsticking, was long banned, but he has legalize it again. as chairman of the pigsticking international club, he wants to use the hunt as a way to draw tourists to the region. hunters pay at least 5000 euros per team to take part, money the locals could really use, so he prays to god to save spain and give people jobs. >> in our region, this really could be a way out of the crisis. we hope to get customers from abroad interested in the hun
that they didn't scrap it altogether. >> reporter: some artists are searching for an environment that gives them freedom to create whatever they want. an hour's drive from central beijing brings us to a village with lots of museums and studios. here 5,000 artists indulge their passions. among them is an actor. three years ago he began exposing society's shortcomings. in the summer the communist party congress was only a month away, so this actor staged a special performance. he called this the democratic election. the message? in this democracy we can't choose our leaders. he invited passers-by to watch the performance. on their ballots the 200 people who attended wrote the name of a candidate they would choose. but a month before the congress, the police came. like his cartoon about the party's total power, they took him away. they didn't release him until the end of october. china aims to be an artistic and cultural powerhouse, but he says the party's heavy hand smothers true artistic expression. >> translator: the government keeps saying it wants to nurture art, but what art are they talking
appealed to him, and they didn't now. finding neither subjects nor an artistic environment that suited him, he left london and traveled 275 miles to the north. he settled in the small fishing village of cullercoats on the north sea and rented a studio two houses from the rescue station, overlooking the beach. here was his first encounter with the wild and elemental forces of nature. the rhythm of life in cullercoats was termined by the fishing boats, which set out at dusk and returned in the morning. gradually, homer began to replace descriptive detail with the concentrated drama of individuals bent on the task of survival in a rugged environment. although he had intended to stay in cullercoats only for the summer, he remained almost two years. in october, he watched the life brigade rescue the crew of a wrecked ship-- the iron crown. he sketched the scene from the beach and later painted one of his largest and most ambitious watercolors. at cullercoats, homer's works took on a new monumentality. in the lives of the fisherwomen, he perceived both the gravity of the human condition and the
what the environment means in haiti. >> the environment means a lot. haiti is a country that has been hit by seasonal climate events almost every year. weather events and hurricanes have severely affected the country. every year, thousands of people are dying. many have been displaced. many others are still homeless. as a youth, it is my responsibility to take part in these activities, to do something about it. i would like to see climate justice. >> what the climate justice mean to you? >> for me, eradication of poverty. that means developed countries need to take responsibility by fulfilling -- by providing finance, which is key for countries like haiti. >> marco, what the climate justice mean to you? >> all of that, including the fact that currently, emissions in the atmosphere, 75% are coming from developed countries , countries that have done everything for over a century and now they're trying to place the burden on developed countries -- developing countries who barely have enough to eat. we have a severe injustice here that we need to act on. climate justice, in a nutshell, me
donald payne to require firsthand knowledge of how the workplace works and the environment in which those miners go to work every day. in the classroom, lynn woolsey continues to fight for women and working families. she was -- i want to say harsh, but i will say tough advocate. making sure that women were represented in the stem fields and the careers and women and young women had access to the sciences and to technology and to math and engineering. lynn woolsey worked to ensure kids had access at every education -- every education opportunity and a well-rounded curriculum to meet their social and emotional needs. american families have benefited from lynn woolsey's fierced a vow casey. harsh, spirited. that's our advocate, lynn. i will miss here contributions on the education committee for the years to come. she's fought tirelessly to protect the environment. most especially in the sonoma coast of san francisco bay and hopefully the president will follow her lead and designate further protections of our ocean and marine habitat in that area of our precious coast. i am very grateful for
to implement. i will say, however, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is substantially larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principal and therefore this will be a more valuable change. second because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far larger. frankly, not many loans in the past have hit that limit. so even though it's $1 trillion portfolio, the value of that change is quite small for the old loans. it's really going to be quite valuable for these newer very low interest rate loans. >> i'll be briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that's a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. i don't understand. why are you doing that? >> this is another area where we are working on changes. here's the issue. we have a significant number of homeowners that were responsible homeowners, had good credit scores that lost their jobs in the biggest economic crisis th
will say, however, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principal. therefore, this will be a more valuable change. second, because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far longer. not many loans in the past have hit that limit. even though it is $1 trillion, the value of the change is small for the old loans. it is going to be valuable for these newer, very low interest rate loans. >> briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that is a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. why are you doing that? put this is another area where we are working on changes. responsible hone owners got good credit scores that lost their jobs. we believe somebody can show that they are back to work and a responsible borer again. that is someone we would work with. i would agree that our standards are not clear enough in dividing those. so what we
'll be saving the environment on that. >> if you're tired of buying make your own. >> soda stream revolution, one-touch technology. so easy to use, put the -- check that out, put the bottle inside there, snaps in there, pick the fizz you want, press it in there, it has a monitor that lets you know how much fizz you're putting in. 60 flavors to choose from none of which have high fructose corn syrup or aspartame. >> before we go, who doesn't want to throw their iphone into water? >> put that in there. this is the first android smartphone. drop it in there. you can get without a contract, $70 from boost mobile and it's water proof, three feet in 30 minutes and it won't ruin. >> no more running for the tub of rice. there you go. thank you so much, fun ideas. really appreciate it. time right now, 7:29, 51 degrees on tv hill. stay with us. >> you're watching wbal-tv 11, live, local, late breaking. this is 11 news sunday morning. >> welcome back to 11 news sunday morning, thanks for waking up with us today. >> we're getting a check outside. is it clearing up? >> hardly, dense fog people have to wo
look at jobs report tomorrow, is dismal. we're liking inflationary environment down the road. this is bad news. >> you could could make the argument invite blowing past short term helpful, long term payne full. melissa: spending cuts, tax hikes are very dramatic going over the cliff. when you look at numbers, still is like five to one raising taxes to cutting spending. >> that's right. melissa: no one is really talking about cutting spending. isn't that the first thing you would do? if your fiscal house was in such disarray, household at home, first thing you do is stop spending. no one is doing that. >> what scares me, is that point. whether you agree or disagree hiking taxes i am not a fan of it but i think it will come. we can get past this. charlie gasparino and i have argued this. one of the consequences of the election the president will probably get his way raising most rates. melissa: right. >> i'm not saying i'm a fan. let's get past that, let's make it happen. republicans realize you lost election you didn't suddenly lose your backbone. this should be precursor gett
clear, natural sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. (testimonial section) (testimonial section) (testimonial section) did you know, 94% of people who use lyric would recommend lyric to a friend or loved one. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's vanced technology, call or visit trylyric.com for a risk--free 30--day trialffer. you'll also get a free informational dvd and brochure. why wait? hear today what a little lyric cacan do for you. lyric from phonak. life is on. >> breaking news from the white house, here is administration's response to the jobs market. alan krueger, chairman of economic advisors says, look, today's report provides further evidence today's economy is going to heal and here is part of the white house response. it's critical that we continue the policies that are building an economy that works for the middle class as we dig our way out of the deep hole caused by the severe recession. okay, keep going. we want these policies, that's from the white house. tax increases coming next
and the environment. europe, japan and russia are also expected to continue to decline. connell: a matter of time, as they say. this fox business exclusive, we will talk about the war on business. it was a record year for anti-trust funds. dagen: the sanctions against iran. if this policy will change anything over there. the state of the economy and why it matters to you and this, the cost of crude oil. take a look at it. more than $86 a barrel. stubbornly high. ♪ >> announcer: you never know when, but thieves can steal your identity and turn your life side down. >> hi. >> hi. you know, i can save you % today if you open up a charge card account with us. >> you just read my mind. >> announcer: just one little piece of information and they caopen bogus accounts, stealing your credit, your money and ruining your reputation. that's why you need lifelock to relentlessly protect what matters most... [beeping...] helping stop crooks before your identity is attacked. and now you can have t most corehensive identity theft protection available today... lifelock ultimate. so for protection you just can't
investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. >>> an environment where everyone is still terrified about the potential impact of the fiscal cliff, i want to give you stocks that you can fall back on in a declining market. many strong companies, high yields. let me introduce you to weingarten, a company i've liked since '85. owns shopping centers all over the u.s. 301 income-producing properties and 11 more in various stages of development. they have a yield, doesn't have a lot of leverage. company recently sold off the portfolio of industrial assets to become a pure play on retail, and 70% of the rent it collects comes from tenants that are effectively internet resistant. they say it in their own papers. meaning they're immunized against online competition. things like supermarkets, restaurants, personal care supervisors. 93.6% occupancy rate up 200 basis points year-over-year. very bullish guidance. let's check in with drew alexander, the president and ceo of weingarten reality investors. how are you? >> pleasure. great to be here. >> now, we obviously are all very focused on the
to allocate capital then in that environment. i know george young is with us again, joining the conversation. i want to ask you the same question. go ahead, scott. how are you investing right now? >> maria, i think the best way forward is the way it's worked since the bottom of the market in 2009. risk assets are where it's at. the fed is very supportive. the consumer is back and engaged. housing is getting better. the fiscal cliff is actually constructive from the standpoint it causes people to come together and compromise because going over the cliff while we may do it for a short time period is not beneficial to anybody. it hurts everybody. >> so risk assets being, what, technology? what does that mean, technology? >> not necessarily. we would stay with dividend payers. we would also dip our toe into europe into some very high-quality, multicountry stocks there. mostly on consumer discretionary stocks as well. >> george, we haven't forgotten you yet. scott, i have a question for you. just noticed today france and germany's stock markets hit 52-week highs. we're still wringing our hands ov
because we're stuck in a real tough environment right now with that darn fiscal cliff deadline looming, three weeks away, our political leaders getting absolutely nowhere -- >> buy buy buy! >> sell sell sell! >> it doesn't mean we stop searching for opportunities to make money. even in the most dismal markets there are always stocks that have the ability to go higher. just got to find them. takes a lot of work. one i've been doing a lot of work on, it's called dst systems. dog sam tom. now, dst is not a great business. hmm. but i think it could be a terrific stock. the reason? i see number signs suggesting that dst could be preparing itself for a sale. and if not, it sure as heck should be. but even if dst doesn't get bought out, it has a fabulous story. it's a tale that we've repeated over and over again. it's one that's made big money in a number of stocks for us. see, dst, which is just a terrible name for a company, but that's what they call themselves, is a company where the whole is currently worth a lot less than the parts. now, in recent months dst has started to get aggressive
% interest rate environment until 2013. and after, they will still be at that point. >> the reason i ask. wednesday they've got the new announcement. operation twist which has kept rates low. >> and they'll probably extend. >> you think they'll extend that. will the market respond though? >> i think that allows the market then to price what's going to happen on the fiscal side. fiscal tightening, there's a responsibility. in europe they're trying to shrink their way into growth. i don't think that's going to work. in the united states we have to have short-term balance stimulus and longer term very controlled ratcheted down austerity. if that does happen, you could set the backdrop for a solid economy. >> what would you buy here right now? >> the discussions we're having with our clients is that they shouldn't be taking any more credit risks than they're comfortable with. everything can change very quickly if the politicians fail to come up with a responsible solution to this. foremost, you shouldn't be taking excess credit risk right now. if we slip into a recession, there's a lot of mo
is an extension of the rather slow-growth environment had a we've seen that will help propel equity prices higher but not dramatically over the next year or two. >> bob pisani likened the fiscal cliff to y2k, and it is to a certain degree, at least in terms of decision and hiring and that kind of thing, it's creating some kind of paralysis. you talked to the traders here on the floor of the stock exchange. is it creating paralysis for them as well? they are not making any big bets until they know what happened. >> y2k created a lot of talk but didn't have impact on the stock market. i was here for that. the fiscal cliff has more impact, and it did today. i watched what the markets are doing today. today when bernanke was on, i saw interest rates move up, bond yields move up, highs for the day, and i saw stocks move down. that's kind of the opposite of what bernanke was wanting to have happen. >> right. >> and two things, guys, that did that. number one, he was questioned persistently about the fiscal cliff and had to come out and say what he said before we don't have the tools to deal with it if
. there are plenty of real worries out there. especially the fiscal cliff. in this grim environment you can find sectors that are holding up better than you might think. poncy says the pull back in retail might be just the moment that you want to pull the trigger to this key sector index. wouldn't that be something? stay with cramer and we will be right back. >> coming up. something is brewing. starbucks has been serving up solid returns. but could concerns about its moving to tea mean it is time to layoff the caffeine or is this your chance to fill up your cup before the shares really get percolating? cramer is grinding through the facts next. >>> tomorrow we are going to hear from one of my favorite companies and it is starbucks. having its biennial analyst day. right now it is more than ten points off its high for the year. i think it could mark the beginning of the stock's next big rally. you can follow along at actionalertsplus.com. a service that i do with the street. tomorrow i expect a terrific story. i'll give you a preview. lots of people ask me how i would approach this meeting. if i
and the ability to work with others in a competitive environment is a huge life skill. competitive sports and the extraordinary game of american football. >> what do you want for christmas? >> at least an 8-8 record by the dolphins. i know i should aim higher. >> mrs. rubio, happy birthday. we appreciate you being here. thank you for being here and thankful to the bank of america. and thank you for coming out early. senator rubio for a fantastic conversation. [applause] captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> president obama addressed a group of corporate executives today in washington. he talked about negotiations with congressional republicans on deficit reduction and the so-called fiscal cliff. >> the holdup right now is that speaker boehner took a position -- i think the day after the campaign -- that said we're willing to bring in revenue, but we aren't willing to increase rates. and i just explained to you why we don't think that works. we're not trying to -- we're not insisting on rates just out of spite or
the new jobs come, from but we have got to have an environment that creates jobs for everyone and you've done the studies yourself to show that increasing taxes on the top 2%, the portion of that that falls into small business owners who actually pass that through their personal income, is small and the portion of those that actually employs several workers is small, so i'm not arguing that taxes should go up for the rich. that's somebody else's argument to have. my point is it's not going to crush the economy to do so. >> so much heat of the conversation is just around the taxes for the rich. the jobs numbers, rear view mirror. >> absolutely. >> talking about how to fix it and how we're going to buttress the recovery. >> now we look at the future. >> ali velshi, thanks. >>> up next, america's oldest dictionary has announced the words of the year. can you tell it was an election year. which one was the most popular search in 2012. the answer after the break. health care system i wae spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my
. they encouraged more science and engineers. there were not going to create the environment where they would do more work. i am very disturbed and i want to say that one great state inner city is talking about incentives as against creating disincentives. you have to have people who are the imaginative and can look beyond the current crisis. that also has been part of the american middle class. >> i would like to see that -- more of an emphasis on science and math. in terms of k-8th grade. >> one of the great stories of physics, a young physicist who had learned, they started going back to questions of the uncertainty and they became more philosophical. this creates the area for areas of physics in the 1970's. you're not thinking about the deeper ideas and not setting up the framework for thinking operationally. >> do you want to pick up on any of that first? >> only for one thing. i fear that we have a burgeoning student loan problems in our country. it is the only form of consumer debt that has increased substantially. it is by definition subprime. if we look at it on apple's bases, you do no
the creation of jobs in the u.s. economy. if you can get the u.s. economy past this model through environment, you will see a slight acceleration in the second half. cheryl: your last point is manufacturing. in the report, it was basically flat. we had downward revision for september and october from the report. you are not concerned about that sector at all? >> i am not concerned about that sector. we are looking at a longer-term and the impact it has on the u.s. economy. when you look at what the u.s. does in a manufacturing basis, we manufacture 18.2% of other manufactured goods in the world today. that is bigger than japan. that is bigger than china. it is a very significant number. we do it better and less expensively. cheryl: a report saying it would be a good thing for this country if we begin to export natural gas. it would be good for the u.s. economy. some, especially in washington, saying it would be a bad thing. it would be a job killer. >> it is hard to me to figure that out. i think we have to find a balance between exports and the cheap fuel in the united states which will caus
environment. liz: look at hurricane sandy with his bizarre storm surge, a snowstorm here in october and nothing all winter. how does that affect my portfolio? >> i think if you look carefully, we can see firms you think might do well in a world which has more climate distress. and firms that won't. firms, they actually look like they are overpriced. it was expensive. that means people are actually investing in these kinds of industries and that means investing population is worried about it. liz: look at vail resorts but they hit because there is no snow and skiing companies. we cannot roll the something that we don't know, but it is a concern. let's get the number one. something we were talking a lot about and stopped because the fiscal cliff insanity. that is. >> europe. europe has the potential to unravel this is not a decade-long agenda, this is actually within a year maybe, i don't know. it has the possibility of breaking apart, having a severe recession that will impact the u.s. economy and that made all this momentum that we are hopefully starting to see in the u.s. economy.
an environment in which we can care for the elderly. >> the think americans will remain optimistic but this did of the economy? if we have not tackle the things we have just talked about like the cost of education, the housing market? we are figuring out some philosophical issues about taxing and funding? >> i think the economy has been growing slowly and steadily all in the absence of any movement, which we have seen over the test of the last year. i have worked on guantanamo for the past 10 years. my sense is that if there is some movement until the positive direction, which have not seen out of washington and enter a long time, -- in a long time, at least we will not see head winds. we are making some progress. i see that continue. >> i want to come back to what todd said earlier. i am concerned about confidence being fragile. todd reference what happened until august of 2011. we saw in limited to lie confidence tank. market confidence grew jog with some of the market confidence plunged. i think we have to be concerned -- market confidence plunged. if we look like we are not grappling with t
are in a very good environment. and in north america, obviously, is important. europe is obviously important. but you're focusing on emerging markets. >> yes. >> even putting manufacturing, which i'm not sure, why would you build -- you're building a $100 million plant in africa. why not just export to avenue from from other places? why build a plant in africa? >> we have going to affect the organization from here. this was a unique opportunity because it was a state-owned factory. we managed to take over and they needed technology. and why produce there is a huge market. there are 1 billion people right now, the population will double. >> on the continent? >> yeah. on the continent of africa. they have a problem with feud security now. they have 60% of the global reserves of tillable land, which is great news, and only 20% of this land are used today, are farms today. therefore, it is a very interesting market. i'm very proud that we discovered it first and that we will be there also the first to manufacture from the western global players. >> so private corporation. who needs to go into th
. >> except that if we go over the cliff and given how tenuous this economic environment is right now, i mean, the message that sends to business leaders, employers, let alone the american people, is this place is not only ungovernable, it is dysfunction beyond dysfunction. >> a friend of mine, a wealthy california guy, a liberal, said, if you think they're going to trust you after you miss the january 1st deadline, they'll be no trust. they'll say, if you can't meet your own deadline, why would you meet anybody else's. >> and the markets, whether it's europe or american, are pricing in a solution. you see it really quite clearly. >> somebody was on -- mcmahon yesterday was wrong, they're not pricing a failure, they're pricing in a solution. thank you, chris kofinis, for that report from greece. jared bernstein, as always, thank you. >>> when we return, let me finish with the ghost of fiscal cliff yet to come. wait until you see this story. you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. in what world do potatoes, bacon and cheese add up to 100 calories? y
at starbucks. people are desperate to find something new to buy. >> and in an environment of rising employment, that's a big deal for mcdonald's especially in the breakfast business which is a high margin business. it is highly leveraged to macro indicators too. >> when i go there, there's a promotion going on that didn't bring me into the store. i want to be brought into a store because of a promotion and not discover, wow, i paid much less than i thought. >> i told you about mcbites. will you go into the store now? >> i think they are called mccorn balls now. we changed the name. >> melissa is up to date on the menu. >> yesterday it was mcrib. >> these are very important to the stories of these fast food chains. that's why i'm so -- >> what's the calorie count? when you see the calorie count that's the determinant. can i have three lipitor. >> that's what i'm on right now. >> are you really? where is your bad cholesterol? >> it's not good. not good. >> mine is 80. >> goody for you. that's what happens when you get old. you compare cholesterol levels. >> i went to trader joe's last night. tur
and brakes. few believe like humans dogs should keep the environment in mind when learning to drive. >> with the number of dog motorists at an
. the environmental community can see a reduction in the amount of carbon and an improvement in the environment as well as conservatives can see the idea of leaving it more resources at home and sending less of our wealth abroad. this is a way of doing something different, which is creating a consensus to get something done in the next congress. we are excited for the next congress and to work with all legislators to implement these recommendations and see them through to their felon. i would like to call fred smith, the chairman and founder of fedex. he really needs no introduction. but the truth is fedex and what it is done in our economy is groundbreaking. they are the clipper ships of the modern age. what they see in terms of the economic growth of our country, because they touch every industry, as well as providing the transportation to making our economy grow, i think he is well-suited to discuss this issue. i thank him for being the co- chair since 2006 and joining with general kelley and myself to do this. thank you. >> thank you. i became involved in the council out of self-interest. b
the environment in which people could explore literature especially. i think that there aren't enough programs like this around the country. i wish there were more. the literary community in albany is quite rich, and we are in the feedback loop with it. i don't think such an operation is the write's institute could have been created in the first place without there being not only a strong group of writers formed sort of an -- toward colombia where a lot of new york city writers have weekend holmes all the way up to saratoga and beyond. we have places like the writers' colony there. the writers' groups in hudson, new york. east to west and western massachusetts, and west to syracuse. that's the audience sort of circumference that we work with. so when you go back, and you find a general population quite proud of albany's connections to henry james and irwin or even bread heart, a story writer, or just, you know, a little bit further east over to emily dickinson or a little bit further south to say hi to the friend walt witman or edith gourdman. when you have the sense of the cultural heritage,
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 106 (some duplicates have been removed)